How women are disproportionately impacted by Climate Change

 On the path to Waku in Solukhumbo, February 2017. The Glacier Trust is working with Eco Himal Nepal in Waku to enable families to adapt to the impacts of climate change. 

On the path to Waku in Solukhumbo, February 2017. The Glacier Trust is working with Eco Himal Nepal in Waku to enable families to adapt to the impacts of climate change. 

Earlier this month ICIMOD published a very important paper on the gender imbalances experienced in the Hindu Kush Himalaya region. Noting that the situation is particularly acute in Nepal, this article from Juhi Chaudhary for thethirdpole.net provides an excellent summary of the report and its findings. 

Juhi Chaudary:

Gender structures and deeply entrenched socio-cultural ideologies that marginalise women’s work make women more vulnerable than men. Mountain women, who have great a resilience and the knowledge to adapt to various stresses, are often left out of key decision-making processes and are marginalised further, even though they are likely to suffer more in the future. Climate change is bound to increase these gender inequalities further in many ways.

The Glacier Trust recognises and addresses these gender issues in project design and delivery, but we are acutely aware of the need for fundamental structural solutions to gender inequality in Nepal and worldwide.